Cucumbers tainted with Salmonella make their way to Indiana, Michigan

CDC

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -- The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in conjunction with Fresh Start Produce Sale Inc. have announced a recall on cucumbers that may be contaminated with Salmonella.

"Epidemiologic data show that cucumbers may be contaminated with Salmonella and may be making people sick," CDC officials said. "Testing identified Salmonella in a cucumber collected as part of this investigation, which resulted in a recall. Further testing is underway to see if it is the same strain as the one making people sick. Investigators are also working to collect more information to see if other cucumbers are affected."

Fresh Start Produce Sales say the cucumbers were grown in Florida and sold in bulk to retail distribution centers, wholesalers, and food service distributors in 14 states, "but these sellers may have shipped to additional states or re-packaged them for stores."

Although the only states the cucumbers were shipped to were Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia, four people in Michigan and one person in Indiana are sick from eating the tainted vegetable.

Officials say this recall does not include English cucumbers or mini cucumbers and that the recalled batch of cucumbers should no longer be in stores.

Call your healthcare provider if you have any of these severe Salmonella symptoms:

  • Diarrhea and a fever higher than 102°F
  • Diarrhea for more than 3 days that is not improving
  • Bloody diarrhea
  • So much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down
  • Signs of dehydration, such as:
  • Not peeing much
  • Dry mouth and throat
  • Feeling dizzy when standing up

Health officials say some people—especially children younger than five years, adults 65 years and older, and people with weakened immune systems—may experience more severe illnesses that require medical treatment or hospitalization.

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